8 Ways for a Successful Customer-Designer Relationship

I worked as a product designer for a while, met dozens of customers and added a lot to me. During this process, I noticed that customers and designers had communication problems. It was because they misunderstood their roles. For this reason, the desired projects take more time and cost than expected and the quality starts to decrease. There's a way to stop it! Read on to learn how to build and maintain an effective client-designer relationship for the success of the project.  

1. Learn that design is based on solving problems.

Many think that design is only about making it visually interesting. This is wrong. It's just the tip of the iceberg. Visuality is the first layer of design and the most obvious. You can see it in a superficial way. That's why the visual appeal is legendary. This legend is quite dangerous because it brings an attitude of "two pixels to the left". The process that people don't see is the underlying thing in the design. The process of solving their problems without realizing it was understood. To solve a problem, you must first understand the basis of the problem. In order to understand it, you must first identify it. The designer goes through these paths and does not include beautiful pictures of interest, but spends a lot of time on conceptual thinking.  

2. Know that something in the middle is difficult and time-consuming to design.

Imagine having a long discussion with a designer. You are waiting for the results of his work for a long time, for days or even weeks, and all he shows you is a draft. You're shocked, but you really shouldn't be. The most important point here is to find solutions that will be invisible and transparent for the end user. İyi Good design is as little and as concise as possible. ”Dieter Rams We tend to notice the bad design that bothers us. And that's the essence of the design - it makes your life easier, because you don't have to deal with problems with all the products.  

3. Understand that the system is beautiful, not the design.

The system is a set of parts that interact or connect together to form a complex whole. In a system, all parts are connected, ie they work with each other in a specific order. Replacing one part affects the working order of the other parts. If a change is to be made, the order in the middle should also be taken into consideration. User roles, technical requirements, input methods, special devices, etc. For each item, button, section, widget should be analyzed. When you want to change an item, please note that it's not just "what you see", but there are things below it.  

4. Treat your designer as your partner.

Imagine a partner not only has a great understanding of your product, but also an expert in problem-solving and design skills! Amazing, isn't it? You can do this in consultation with the designer and use the same approach as your partners. A designer works to help you and your product grow and develop. "If a designer has no idea about the future of the product or business model, we can't expect them to help improve the business." Maciej Lipiec  

5. Always specify your business goals and intentions.

The more the designer knows the product; your intentions, goals, obstacles and fears are better understood. The worst thing you can ask a designer is to wait for her to make a blind estimate of your needs. Let's say you're an archer and you need to hit the target 30 steps away. Looks like a pretty clear and simple request, doesn't it? Now imagine that everything is dark and you don't know where the target is. It looks more difficult now, doesn't it? The designer is an archer, the user needs are the target and the solution is the arrow. So don't force the designer to take a blind shot. Treat the designer as a team-mate or partner. This is the only way to achieve the goal.  

6. Trust your designer

If you don't trust your designer, they will try to convince you that they have made the right decisions. A designer always uses knowledge and intuition to serve users' goals. A designer has knowledge of better instructions, comparisons, more models and sample applications thanks to his training and experience. Therefore, the variety of possible solutions in the designer's head is wider. A designer works to share his experience and expertise. Don't be afraid to take advantage of this.  

7. "Why?" ask.

Asking the right questions in the design process is necessary to get the right answers. The question poses options that you may not have thought of before. Why do we need this feature? What if the user wants to close this model? What happens if the user makes a mistake? Questions allow both parties to perceive solutions. Albert Einstein said we could not solve the problems at the level at which they occurred. Questions enable us to think at a higher level and solve problems. The designer asked the customers "why?" he will ask. He asks this question not because he doesn't like your opinion, but because there are multiple reasons behind a particular request. To a designer: "Can we try other options?" think. The designer needs to know the reason behind this request: - " I think the user won't understand the buttons. ", -" I don't think the user will notice the location of the buttons. ", -" I've reviewed this bill, but I don't understand what these buttons do. ", -" They don't look nice. " It provides. When you ask the designer to change the color of a button, you ask yourself "why?" and share this answer with the designer. Changing the color of the button may not be a good solution. In this case, the designer will present his or her own solution and defend the customer's decisions. This allows the customer to easily understand why these changes have been made. I've reviewed this bill, but I don't understand what these buttons do. ", -" They don't look nice. " When you ask the designer to change the color of a button, you ask yourself "why?" and share this answer with the designer. Changing the color of the button may not be a good solution. In this case, the designer will present his or her own solution and defend the customer's decisions. This allows the customer to easily understand why these changes have been made. I've reviewed this bill, but I don't understand what these buttons do. ", -" They don't look nice. " When you ask the designer to change the color of a button, you ask yourself "why?" and share this answer with the designer. Changing the color of the button may not be a good solution. In this case, the designer will present his own solution and defend the customer's decisions. This allows the customer to easily understand why these changes have been made. and share this answer with the designer. Changing the color of the button may not be a good solution. In this case, the designer will present his own solution and defend the customer's decisions. This allows the customer to easily understand why these changes have been made. and share this answer with the designer. Changing the color of the button may not be a good solution. In this case, the designer will present his own solution and defend the customer's decisions. This allows the customer to easily understand why these changes have been made.  

8. Think in terms of problems.

Basically, think first in terms of problems (the designer is here to produce solutions). You can contribute to solutions, but do not exclude the designer from the process. Instead of applying it without specifying the problem, follow the steps to resolve the problem. It is also a fact that sometimes it is more difficult to identify problems and difficulties than solutions.   Summary;Design varies depending on product features, business goals, and your target group. It is a rational and time-consuming process that requires large amounts of thinking and effort. It is the last stage that is only visually presented from the outside. Don't let misunderstandings and misconceptions about your design harm your project. You will increase your chances of success by understanding and trusting the role of designers, the essence of the design and the challenges they have to face.